About

We are more than camp

CAMP SUSAN CURTIS
IS BUILT ON AN
INSIGHT…

Maine summers can be life-changing for children facing economic hardship. Just as important, camp is fun.

Inspired by our vision and mission, we are more than camp. We nurture the sense of belonging and self-confidence children need to grow.

OUR FOUNDING

It all began with Susan…

The daughter of Maine Gov. Kenneth M. Curtis and Pauline B. Curtis, Susan Curtis, was 11 years old when she passed away from cystic fibrosis in 1971. In the outpouring of sympathy and support for the Curtis family a group came together. Their goal, to offer tribute and to make a difference, became a life-changing action. They saw Maine children facing roadblocks to education, development, and success — roadblocks rooted deep in economic hardship. They had another insight too: They saw that a sense of belonging and the power of Maine’s outdoors could mitigate the effects of economic hardship.

Our founders always believed every child matters. Their wisdom became Camp Susan Curtis, a safe haven where young spirits are nourished, friendships are made, and a belief is held that every Maine child deserves to know and realize their full potential. Our Founders: Governor Kenneth M. Curtis, Pauline B. Curtis, Joel W. Bloom, Alton E. “Chuck” Cianchette, Robert J. Dunfey, Sr., Charles P. Harriman, Scott F. Hutchinson, F. Woodman Jones, Robert A.G. Monks.

Kids Grow Best in a Caring Community

MEET OUR TRUSTEES & STAFF

CAMP HISTORY

Camp Susan Curtis would first like to recognize that we exist on unceded indigenous homelands; the ancestral fishing, hunting, and agricultural grounds of the Abenaki, People of the Dawnland, who have inhabited this region for thousands of years.

In 1822, the Allen family lived on the current site of Camp Susan Curtis at what is now known as Millet’s Farm. The Allens owned the lake area and a large amount of the surrounding land.

In the 1920s, Benjamin Brown and Mr. Friend purchased a portion of the Allens’ property and established the first camps. At the time, these were adult, sportsman camps, meant for activities such as hunting and hiking. But Brown struggled to keep his camps afloat once the depression hit.

As a result, in the mid-1930s, Charles Hamilton bought the land and established the Trout Lake Camp for Boys. Future astronaut Buzz Aldrin was among the boys who attended.

After Hamilton, the camp was operated by a man named D’Armount. Then, in 1966, the property was purchased by the Levines, who relocated Camp Trebor, a girl’s camp formerly on Lovewell Pond in Fryeburg, to the Stoneham site.

In 1974, the camp was purchased by the Susan L. Curtis Foundation and re-named Camp Susan Curtis. Since then, it has impacted the lives of more than 18,000 Maine children facing economic hardship.

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CAMP BY THE NUMBERS

19,000

MAINE KIDS

playing, learning, and making friends since 1974

13

CAMPER CABINS

where campers create lasting friendships with their “cabin families”

3

NOURISHING MEALS

 a day to keep campers healthy and energized

6

SKILL AREAS

with programs for kids to discover their unique interests

100

ACRES

of pristine conservation land for campers to
grow and play

54

ACRE LAKE

where kids learn to swim, kayak and paddleboard

23

OBSTACLE ROPES COURSE

that encourages leadership and collaboration

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CAMP LEADERS

who provide campers with caring support and encouragement

Celebrate the potential of each child.

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“Camp is different from school and home because I can make friends. I can be myself at camp. I don’t have to worry about people not liking me because people here are nice. No one is more special than the other. I feel that I belong at camp.”

– Camper Chloe